Querying Collaboration

FORTUN, KIM. “THE BHOPAL DISASTER: Advocacy and Expertise.” SCIENCE AS CULTURE, n.d., 13.

In this article, Kim Fortun discusses her affiliation with the Bhopal Group for Information and Action and her experiences as an advocate for the Bhopal Gas Affected Working Women's Union. She uses this discussion to develop a theory of advocacy "as a way to expertise, which complicates...Read more

Fortun, Kim, and Todd Cherkasky. “Guest Editorial: Strategizing Counter‐expertise.” Science as Culture 7, no. 2 (June 1998): 141–44.

Kim Fortun and Todd Cherkasky explicate how they are thinking about "counter-expertise" as "a way of taking responsibility for expert knowledge and status, while questioning the conventional role experts play in framing political choices" (1998, 141).Read more

Choy, Timothy K., Lieba Faier, Michael J. Hathaway, Miyako Inoue, Shiho Satsuka, and Anna Tsing. “A New Form of Collaboration in Cultural Anthropology: Matsutake Worlds.” American Ethnologist 36, no. 2 (May 2009): 380–403.

Abstract: Experiments in collaboration open new investigative possibilities for cultural anthropologists. In this report, we use our research on matsutake mushrooms to show the promise of collaborative experiments for ethnographers of scale making, global connection, and human–nonhuman relations...Read more

Fortun, Michael. “Institutionalizing Indirection: Science at the Crossroads of Scholarship and Politics.” Science as Culture 7, no. 2 (June 1998): 173–92.

In this article, Mike Fortun discusses discusses the complicated double-binds that impacted his "response-ability" while working in and on the Institute for Science and Interdisciplinary Studies (ISIS).Read more

Star, Susan Leigh, and James R. Griesemer. “Institutional Ecology, `Translations’ and Boundary Objects: Amateurs and Professionals in Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, 1907-39.” Social Studies of Science 19, no. 3 (August 1989): 387–420.

Abstract: Scientific work is heterogeneous, requiring many different actors and viewpoints. It also requires cooperation. The two create tension between divergent viewpoints and the need for generalizable findings. We present a model of how one group of actors managed this tension. It draws on...Read more

Fleck, Ludwik, Thaddeus J. Trenn, Robert K. Merton, and Fred Bradley. Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. Repr. 11. Aufl. Sociology of Science. Chicago [u.a]: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008.

Ludwik Fleck uses cases studies in the history of biology and medical science to develop his conception of thought styles and thought collectives, arguing that all knowledge is relative to epistemic communities with historically specific manners of thinking and interacting.Read more

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