Querying Collaboration

Kenner, Ali. “Designing Digital Infrastructure: Four Considerations for Scholarly Publishing Projects.” Cultural Anthropology 29, no. 2 (May 19, 2014): 264–87.

ABSTRACT: As we move discussions around publishing forward and adopt open-access models, social scientists need to consider how digital infrastructure opens and closes possibilities for scholarly production and engagement. Attention to changes in publishing infrastructure— which, like most...Read more

Halpern, Megan K., Ingrid Erickson, Laura Forlano, and Geri K. Gay. “Designing Collaboration: Comparing Cases Exploring Cultural Probes as Boundary-Negotiating Objects,” 1093. ACM Press, 2013.

ABSTRACT: This paper examines the use of cultural probes as a method for fostering collaboration within groups of diverse experts working on creative projects. Using two case examples, we show that probes—short, oblique, and at times whimsical sets of activity prompts—have boundary object...Read more

Kaplan, Carey and Cronan, Ellen Rose. "Strange Bedfellows: Feminist Collaboration,"Signs, Vol. 18, No. 3 (Spring, 1993), pp. 547-561.

JA: In this article, Carey Kaplan and Ellen Cronan Rose discuss their long-term experiences collaborating together on various writing projects.Read more

Gorman, Michael E. “Levels of Expertise and Trading Zones: A Framework for Multidisciplinary Collaboration.” Social Studies of Science 32, no. 5–6 (December 2002): 933–38.

Michael Gorman discusses the utility of the concepts "boundary objects" and "trading zones" in the study of collaborations across differing levels of expertise.Read more

Fleck, Ludwik, Thaddeus J. Trenn, Robert K. Merton, and Fred Bradley. Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. Repr. 11. Aufl. Sociology of Science. Chicago [u.a]: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008.

Ludwik Fleck uses cases studies in the history of biology and medical science to develop his conception of thought styles and thought collectives, arguing that all knowledge is relative to epistemic communities with historically specific manners of thinking and interacting.Read more

Leigh Star, Susan. “This Is Not a Boundary Object: Reflections on the Origin of a Concept.” Science, Technology, & Human Values 35, no. 5 (September 2010): 601–17.

Abstract: There are three components to boundary objects as outlined in the original 1989 article. Interpretive flexibility, the structure of informatic and work
process needs and arrangements, and, finally, the dynamic between illstructured
and more tailored uses of the objects. Much of...Read more

Subscribe to Querying Collaboration